"Broken Embraces"

April 2010

201004_br_brokenemb_280wPedro Almodóvar Adroitly Juggles Two Films Within a Film and Pulls an Engrossing, Sexually Charged Thriller Out of the Hat 

Sony Home Entertainment 33186
Format: Blu-ray

Overall Enjoyment
****emptystar
Picture Quality
****emptystar
Sound Quality
****emptystar
Extras
**1/2emptystaremptystar

Pedro Almodóvar is a filmmaker’s director. Every frame he makes seems full of a knowing exuberance that’s in the same breath new and tribute. In this most recent film, he channels a bit of Alfred Hitchcock, while the voluptuous Penélope Cruz as Lena shows an occasional trace of Audrey Hepburn. Almodóvar even gives a nod to Orson Welles by giving his main character, Mateo Blanco (Lluís Homar), the pseudonym "Harry Caine" (from Harry Lime and Citizen Kane). In Broken Embraces, a mystery tale of sex, love, and revenge, Almodóvar skillfully juggles several stories at once. In the present, director and screenplay writer Harry Caine spins out a story about the past, when he went by his real name and fell in love with Lena while making a movie called Girls and Suitcases. A young documentary filmmaker, Ray X (Rubén Ochandiano), approaches Caine with the idea of making a film, one which turns out to be autobiographical. Ray is constantly filming everything and everyone with his handheld camera, both in the present and in flashbacks. So, with Girls and Suitcases and Ray’s constant documentary filming, we have two films within the main film, the latter told with a flashback storyline. Confused? Amazingly, Almodóvar makes it all clear and the stories cleverly converge in the last reel, with surprises that are more satisfying than shocking. The cast is perfect in every way, and Cruz is outstanding. She may be one of the most beautiful women in the world, but she doesn’t just rely on her looks. Her subtle characterization and ability to get under the skin of a character make her an entirely believable and consummate actor.

Almodóvar makes strong use of primary colors, particularly red. Looking at this vibrant, nearly perfect Blu-ray transfer, I was reminded of the days of laserdisc, when it would have been a miracle to achieve reds like these without severe bleeding. The Blu-ray also has a comforting light grain throughout that gives it a real movie look, and the level of detail ranges from adequate to outstanding, depending on the scene. The 5.1 DTS-HD Master Audio sound is mostly up front (except on a few occasions when the rear channels provide atmosphere) and it’s kind to both the music and the dialog. Unfortunately, the extras, which include a short but interesting sequence where Almodóvar directs Cruz, are pretty lame. You can also see more of the Girls and Suitcases film by watching the first of three deleted scenes, which you can follow with "The Cannibalistic Councillor." The film is in Spanish, by the way, with easy-to-read subtitles.

Be sure to watch for: Chapter 8, at 48 minutes and 50 seconds. An overview shot shows Lena chopping tomatoes, cucumber, and garlic for gazpacho. The vibrant wood tones of the chopping block, the brilliant reds of the tomatoes, and the greens of the cucumbers have incredible presence. Lena sheds a tear, and in an unforgettable moment of movie magic, we see a close-up of it striking the tomato’s surface.

. . . Rad Bennett
radb@soundstagenetwork.com

"Toy Story: Special Edition"

April 2010

201004_br_toystory_280wBlu-ray Gives Buzz and Woody HD Ignition to Soar “To Infinity and Beyond”

Disney 103234
Formats: Blu-ray, DVD

Overall Enjoyment
****1/2
Picture Quality
*****
Sound Quality
****1/2
Extras
****1/2

Toy Story, released in 1995, was a gamble for Disney and Pixar, much like Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs in 1937. Snow White was the first animated feature film, and Toy Story was the first computer-animated feature film. Both proved naysayers wrong by becoming monster hits. On the eve of the June release of Toy Story 3, and the double-feature theatrical release of Toy Story and Toy Story 2 in 3D, Disney and Pixar have released Toy Story and Toy Story 2 on separate Blu-rays, and the results are outstanding.

The stories, featuring toys that come to life when people leave the room, appeal to all ages. In Toy Story, Woody (voiced by Tom Hanks), a western sheriff marionette, is the toys’ leader, and he’s temporarily ousted after his owner, Andy (John Morris), receives a Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen) action figure for his birthday. After some bad blood and a series of mishaps, Woody and Buzz become best friends, winning over all odds in a series of breathtaking chases.

Toy Story’s sparkling Blu-ray picture is as good as it gets. Transferred in the digital realm, it’s bright and colorful with spot-on detail from beginning to end. The DTS-HD Master Audio soundtrack has satisfying presence and full-range frequency response. The sound is anchored in the front channels but spreads around the room at appropriate moments. Extras are plentiful and include most of the extras from the 10th Anniversary DVD release (in SD) as well as a new HD set put together specifically for the Blu-ray. These include a chilling black-and-white storyboard look at the original pitch made to Disney, in which Woody was quarrelsome and mean. No kidding. We’re all happy that changed to make this one of the most endearing classics in the history of animated film and a Blu-ray must-have for your collection. And if you don’t have Blu-ray yet, there’s an excellent DVD disc included, so you can watch it until you get a BD player.

Be sure to watch for: Chapter 12, “Lost at the Gas Station,” a perfect test for contrast and brightness settings. When Woody and Buzz scuffle under a vehicle, darks should be quite dark but there should be excellent shadow detail. And in Chapter 27, “The Chase,” the detail is so great that you should have a definite three-dimensional sense of the action. Without glasses.

. . . Rad Bennett
radb@soundstagenetwork.com

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